Into the Deep: The Submarine Murder Case
Into the Deep: The Submarine Murder Case (2022)
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‘Into the Deep: The Submarine Murder Case’ – A Most Disturbing Documentary on Netflix

True Crime Without Sensationalist Frills

Review

Total Rating
5.9/10
Overall
5.9/10

Premise

In 2016, a young Australian filmmaker began documenting amateur inventor Peter Madsen. One year in, Madsen brutally murdered Kim Wall aboard his homemade submarine. An unprecedented revelation of a killer and the journey his young helpers take as they reckon with their own complicity and prepare to testify.

Review

This is a true crime documentary that follows the psychopathic Peter Madsen, and his naïve followers.

The whole story is a big tragedy as Swedish journalist, Kim Wall, was murdered by this man.

Do not expect the usual true crime sensationalism. We come up and close to the killer and the people who surrounded him without visual frills and fancy production, making it all the more unpleasant. This is a filmed with a handheld camera all the way, with few interjections of archive media footage. If there is anything in this documentary that is noteworthy it is precisely the setting aside of a sensationalist approach, thereby refusing trivialize cases such as this one. It is impactful, but not in a feel good way.

Release Date

September 30, 2022.

Where to Watch ‘Into the Deep: The Submarine Murder Case’

Netflix

Into the Deep: The Submarine Murder Case (2022)
Into the Deep: The Submarine Murder Case

Movie title: Into the Deep: The Submarine Murder Case

Movie description: In 2016, a young Australian filmmaker began documenting amateur inventor Peter Madsen. One year in, Madsen brutally murdered Kim Wall aboard his homemade submarine. An unprecedented revelation of a killer and the journey his young helpers take as they reckon with their own complicity and prepare to testify.

Date published: September 30, 2022

Country: Denmark

Duration: 90 mins

Director(s): Emma Sullivan

Actor(s): Documentary

Genre: Documentary

Review

Do not expect the usual true crime sensationalism. We come up and close to the killer and the people who surrounded him without visual frills and fancy production, making it all the more unpleasant. This is a filmed with a handheld camera all the way, with few interjections of archive media footage. If there is anything in this documentary that is noteworthy it is precisely the setting aside of a sensationalist approach, thereby refusing trivialize cases such as this one. It is impactful, but not in a feel good way.

Overall
2.5

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