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Marina Adams. LGDR. NY Exhibitions

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Marina Adams, Twenty Springs, 2022. Marina Adams, 4 Corners of the Wind III, 2022. Marina Adams, Let the River Answer, 2021.
Marina Adams, Twenty Springs, 2022. Marina Adams, 4 Corners of the Wind III, 2022. Marina Adams, Let the River Answer, 2021.

What Are You Listening To? is an exhibition of new paintings by Marina Adams. Committed to a pure painterly expression, Adams makes rigorous explorations of color and form that situate her squarely in the tradition of New York School painting, with its emphasis on gesture, spontaneity, and improvisation—an aesthetic and methodology shared with poets, musicians, and dancers alike. Her signature style, refined over several decades, coalesces here in a new body of work in which shifting colors and elastic forms are counterbalanced by the weight of their individual components.

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Sokari Douglas Camp: Jonkonnu – Masquerade

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Sokari Douglas Camp Sugar Cane John Canoe, 2021 Mild steel acrylic paint. 155 x 33 x 26 cm. Courtesy the Artist and October Gallery, London. Photo: Jonathan Greet Courtesy the Artist and October Gallery, London.
Sokari Douglas Camp Sugar Cane John Canoe, 2021 Mild steel acrylic paint. 155 x 33 x 26 cm. Courtesy the Artist and October Gallery, London. Photo: Jonathan Greet Courtesy the Artist and October Gallery, London.

October Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of new works by Sokari Douglas Camp CBE that explore the masquerade of ‘Jonkonnu’ both within its Caribbean context and that of the broader African diaspora. This exhibition will coincide with her large-scale steel sculpture Europe Supported by Africa and America being displayed at the V&A to complement the Africa Fashion exhibition, which opens on 2nd July, 2022. Two more of her larger than life-sized steel sculptures, again relating to Jonkonnu, will also form part of the Kensington and Chelsea Art Week, from 23rd June – 3rd July, 2022.

While researching the origins of the Notting Hill Carnival during the pandemic ‘lockdown,’ Douglas Camp became fascinated by a set of coloured lithographs by Isaac Mendes Belisario, depicting Jonkonnu revellers in Jamaica in the late 1830s. The Jonkonnu festival developed during the period of slavery, when plantation workers celebrated the few days holiday allowed each year with exuberant musical masquerades that recalled their African heritage. During these revels, the slaves would disguise themselves in costumes that borrowed from and parodied western archetypes: admirals, sailors, queens, plantation-owners, actors, etc., each with a dramatic headdress, while mingling with these figures were wild men, nature-spirits, demons etc., whose roots lay deeper in ancestral African traditions.

The striking headgear of the masked revellers reminded the artist of the thrilling Kalabari masquerades of the Nigerian coastal region where she was raised, figures she had previously explored in her work. The outpouring of sculptures that resulted is a heady mix of outlandish characters who trace the overlapping links between still-surviving African masquerades, Caribbean carnival traditions and their most recent incarnation on the streets of London, during the colourfully costumed parades of the Notting Hill Carnival. With these exhilarating new works, Sokari Douglas Camp pays homage to the indomitable ‘carnival spirit’ still surviving despite all adversity. These steel sculptures playfully combine different elements from the interrelated worlds of imaginative masquerades, festival processions and carnival parades. In so doing, they affirm the powerful contribution of African and Caribbean cultures to the multicultural city of London today. While the Notting Hill Carnival has been cancelled for the past two years because of the pandemic, the vital energy of these dancing figures looks forward to a time – soon to come – when the joyful revels return and the entire community unites in celebrating together again our collective powers of resilience.

October Gallery

24 Old Gloucester Street

London WC1N 3AL

Fatima (2020). Movie Reviews

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Fatima (2020)
Fatima (2020)

Fatima is a 2020 drama movie starring Harvey Keitel, Lucia Moniz and Goran Visnjic.

Plot

A trial of faith unfolds at the apex of World War I, when secrets are revealed to 3 courageous Portuguese children through a series of apparitions, while their doubting family and aggressive government officials try to silence them from sharing these messages that will change the world. (Filmaffinity)

Fatima (2020)
Fatima (2020)

Actors

Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel at premiere of RED DRAGON, NY 9/30/2002, by CJ Contino. Depostiphotos

Harvey Keitel

Harvey Keitel is an American actor known for his roles in Taxi Driver (1976)ScorseseThelma & Louise (1991); and Pulp Fiction (1994)Tarantino.

Movie Reviews

In the flourishing faith-based movie genre, this is one of the better ones (…) The production values are first-rate, as are the performances.

Richard Roeper: Chicago Sun-Times

In a pandemic, some might call the film a beacon of hope; others might prefer science to prayer for salvation. As a piece of cinema, though, “Fatima” is unlikely to be canonized.

Michael Ordoña: Los Angeles Times

[It] virtues don’t outweigh its faults. It’s a respectful telling of the story though, and those who already carry its religious water probably won’t mind carrying it again.

John Serba: Decider

Where to Watch Fatima (2020).

On Amazon Prime Video.

Movie Official Trailer

Cast & Crew

Taxi Driver (1976), a Martin Scorsese Movie. Reviews

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Taxi Driver (1976)
Taxi Driver (1976)

Taxi Driver is a 1976 drama movie directed by Martin Scorsese. Starring Robert De Niro. With Jodie Foster, Harvey Keitel and Cybill Shepherd (Moonlight). It was written by Paul Schrader.

Plot

For psychotic, pistol-packing Vietnam vet Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro), New York City seems like a circle of hell. Driving his cab each night through the bleak Manhattan streets, Bickle observes with fanatical loathing the sleazy lowlifes who comprise most of his fares. By day he haunts the porno theaters of 42nd Street, taking his cues from the violent vision of life portrayed in these movies. As badly as Travis wants to connect with the people around him–including Betsy (Cybill Shepherd), a lovely blonde campaign worker, and Iris (Jodie Foster), a prepubescent prostitute he tries to save–his attempts are thwarted and his pent-up rage grows, turning him into a Mohawk-wearing walking time bomb. (Filmaffinity)

Movie Reviews

“One of the few relatively recent films (like ‘The Godfather’) to join the pantheon of popular classics and great American cinema.

Desson Thomson: The Washington Post

A vivid, galvanizing portrait of a character so particular that you may be astonished that he makes consistent dramatic sense.

Vincent Canby: The New York Times

What is completely worthy of recognition here is De Niro’s altogether devastating performance (…) What finally makes the movie so compelling is director Martin Scorsese’s scathing vision of New York.

Kathleen Carroll: New York Daily News

Awards

Oscar: nominated for Best Picture, Actor (De Niro), Supp. Actress (Foster) and OST
Cannes Film Festival: Palme d´Or (Golden Palm) – Best Film
Golden Globe: nominated for Actor – Drama (De Niro), Screenplay

Taxi Driver (40th Anniversary Edition)

Movie Official Trailer

Cast & Crew

Harvey Keitel – Biograpy, Movies, Quotes

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Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel at premiere of RED DRAGON, NY 9/30/2002, by CJ Contino. Depostiphotos

Harvey Keitel is an American actor known for his roles in Taxi Driver (1976), Scorsese; Thelma & Louise (1991); and Pulp Fiction (1994), Tarantino.

About Harvey Keitel

Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel at the “Be Cool” World Premiere, Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, Hollywood, CA 02-14-05. Depostiphotos

Harvey Johannes Keitel was born on May 13, 1939 in New York, United States.

He is known as “the tough guy” in many films. We love The Piano (Jane Campion).

Nowadays, we have watched him in Fatima (2020).

Harvey Keitel Quotes

The way I see things, the way I see life, I see it as a struggle. And there’s a great deal of reward I have gained coming to that understanding – that existence is a struggle.

Everything is difficult, and everything worthwhile is difficult. A certain need, a need not unlike Mickey had: to know, to understand, and I had that need to understand and to know.

So there’s no such thing as one too many this, one too many that. I remember, you’re reminding me of early in my career, somebody said to me: why are you taking so many roles as a policeman.

Harvey Keitel Movies on MCM

Video: BIOGRAPHY OF HARVEY KEITEL

Katt Williams: World War III. Special Stand-Up Comedy en Netflix

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Katt Williams: World War III (2022)
Katt Williams: World War III (2022)

Katt Williams: World War III is a special Stand-Up comedy released on Netflix starring the comedian, actor and rapper Katt Williams.

Plot

It follows Katt Williams as he returns to deliver the unfiltered truth and to hilariously break down conspiracy theories. (Filmaffinity)

The Star

About Katt Williams

Katt Williams
Katt Williams at arrivals for NORBIT Premiere, Mann”s Village Theatre in Westwood, Los Angeles, CA, February 08, 2007. Photo by: Michael Germana/Everett Collection. Depostiphotos

Katt Williams is an American rapper, comedian, actor and rapper known for films like Friday After Next, My Wife and Kids (2005), Norbit (2007) and Scary Movie 5 (2013).

Release Date

May 17, 2022.

Where to Watch Katt Williams: World War III

On Netflix.

Video: Katt Williams: World War III – May 17 | Announcement

Katt Williams. Biography, Movies, Quotes

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Katt Williams
Katt Williams at the "NBC All-Star Party" in the Hollywood & Highland Complex, Hollywood, CA 01-14-04. Depostiphotos

Micah Sierra “Katt” Williams was born on September 2, 1971 in Cincinnati, Ohio,United States.

About Katt Williams

Katt Williams
Katt Williams at arrivals for NORBIT Premiere, Mann”s Village Theatre in Westwood, Los Angeles, CA, February 08, 2007. Photo by: Michael Germana/Everett Collection. Depostiphotos

Katt Williams is an American rapper, comedian, actor and rapper known for films like Friday After Next, My Wife and Kids (2005), Norbit (2007) and Scary Movie 5 (2013).

Nowayds, we has starred in the Netflix Special Katt Williams: World War III (2022).

Katt Williams Quotes

Genius is often called crazy, but crazy is never called genius. So you just have to put out the work and let the chips fall where they may.

There’s only winning and losing, and in our society, as in all societies, there’s the person that’s doing the winning, or there’s the person that’s facilitating the winning.

Aspirin is perfectly legal, but if you take 13 of them motherf***ers, it’ll be your last headache.

Katt Williams on MCM

KW on Twitter

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Video: Every Day I’m Hustlin – Katt Williams: American Hustle

 (50 años)

Bandera de Estados Unidos

Fawn Rogers: Your Perfect Plastic Heart. Wilding Cran Gallery?

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Our Lady Guadalupe, 2020, Oil on canvas, 85 x 65 inches, 215.9 x 165.1 cm.
Our Lady Guadalupe, 2020, Oil on canvas, 85 x 65 inches, 215.9 x 165.1 cm.

Wilding Cran Gallery is pleased to present Your Perfect Plastic Heart, an exhibition of Fawn Rogers’ aesthetic meditations on the oyster as an allegory of life and death, idolatry and empathy, eros and destruction in the Anthropocene.

Imbued with connotations of sensuality, sanctity, and invasion, the oyster has long been portrayed as a symbol of lust, pleasure, opulence, and indulgence. While these creatures are commonly considered luxurious rarities forged by nature, human intervention has subverted the organic process of their beauty and procreation. Through an exploration of ecofeminist theory and practice, Fawn Rogers harnesses Your Perfect Plastic Heart to draw upon the confluence of extinction and eroticism, violence and fragility, inherent within the dichotomous relationship between our built environment and the natural world.

In a geological epoch characterized by pandemic, climate crises, and rampant human rights abuses, Rogers dives into the seemingly contradictory forces at play within the heart of the Anthropocene, wherein the impact of human society upon the natural world is both devastating and undeniable. In an effort to break the continuum of the consumerist exploitation of natural resources, Your Perfect Plastic Heart confronts the viewer with a collection of alluring depictions of painted mollusks. The personification of the oyster serves as a form of archiving these creatures, so as to promote discussions on the violent effects of greed and the impending potential of social and environmental disaster.

Straddling the line between still-life and portraiture, Rogers’ paintings appear deceivingly photorealistic from afar, while revealing the impressionistic intricacies of the painter’s hand upon closer examination. The oscillating interplay between the representational and abstracted qualities of the paintings imbues the larger-than-life canvases with a palpable sense of intimacy and tension. Each subject contributes to a sliding scale of opalescent impact, from carnal to contained, at once beautifully coy and luridly sexual. Presented in dialogue with the varied selection of painted works, Rogers’ film, The World Is Your Oyster, brings the viewer to the edge of an ocean shoreline, contraposing images of sea life and luminescent pearls with discomfiting, yet exquisitely orchestrated shots of slicing, shucking, prodding, and ultimately, excision. As mesmerizing as it is unsettling, the two-channel video draws you in only to spit you back out, therein seducing the viewer to indulge in the simultaneous pleasure and violence of consumption.

The commercial pith of the oyster, the pearl, has been harvested for millennia. Despite being a symbol of sacred purity, the pearl’s inception hinges on corruption, manipulation, and desecration. Since first taking root in the 1960s, the ecofeminist movement has sought to subvert patriarchal ideologies driven by ethics of ownership, domination, and self-interest. The exhibition of Your Perfect Plastic Heart brings Rogers’ film and paintings into dialogue with an installation of framed oyster and sardine boxes, titled Eat You Eat Me, each adorned with painted nude figures. Provocative in and of themselves, upon closer examination of these particular works, the viewer discovers that Rogers has depicted genitalia, in lieu of characteristic facial features. In mirroring the countenance of canned sea creatures with the human body, Rogers’ exhibition draws a striking parallel between the raw vulnerability of sentient sea life and the inherent eroticism embedded within humanity.

It has been said that Earth’s oceans will contain more plastic than sea life by 2050. As inhabitants of the Anthropocene, we each play a role the destruction of our climate, regardless of race, class, or gender. By contemplating the relationship between idolatry and industry in modern society, the world of Your Perfect Plastic Heart challenges the viewer to address their own complicity in the subjugation and commodification of the natural world. In doing so, the works on view move beyond the realm of art installation into aesthetic prayer, guiding the viewer along a path of empathy and reconciliation, to a moment of internal reckoning. After all, the world is your oyster.

About Fawn Rogers
Fawn Rogers is a Los Angeles-based contemporary artist. Through painting, photography, video, and sculptural installation, Rogers addresses the idea of power as the currency of nature and human interaction, while her aesthetic incorporates realism, conceptualism, and the synthesis of text and image. Concerned with systems of the natural world and social constructionism, her art accepts nature as a full range of existence, including violence, innocence, and invention.

Wilding Cran Gallery

HBO Drama Series THE GILDED AGE Begins Production On Season Two

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THE GILDED AGE
THE GILDED AGE
  • Production is currently underway on the second season of the HBO Original drama series THE GILDED AGE in Rhode Island and New York state.
     
  • The series stars Christine Baranski, Cynthia Nixon, Carrie Coon, Morgan Spector, Louisa Jacobson, Denée Benton, Blake Ritson, Taissa Farmiga, Simon Jones, Harry Richardson, Jack Gilpin, Debra Monk, Kristine Nielsen, Taylor Richardson, Ben Ahlers, Kelley Curran, Douglas Sills, Celia Keenan-Bolger, Michael Cerveris, Erin Wilhelmi, Kelli O’Hara, Donna Murphy, Patrick Page, Sullivan Jones.
     
  • Season 2 logline: The Gilded Age was a period of immense economic change, of huge fortunes made and lost, and of fierce rivalry between old money and new. Nowhere is that rivalry more apparent than on East 61st Street, where Marian Brook and her thoroughly old money aunts, Agnes van Rhijn and Ada Brook, live opposite the stupendously rich George and Bertha Russell.  The Russells are both fiercely ambitious, he financially, she socially, and they are determined to reach the highest echelons of New York. Meanwhile in Brooklyn, Marian’s friend and confidant Peggy Scott forges her own path in the world of the Black elite. In this glittering world on the brink of the modern age, will the established rules of society prevail, or will the game change entirely?
     
  • Credits: Creator/writer/executive producer, Julian Fellowes; executive producer, Gareth Neame; director/executive producer, Michael Engler; executive producer, David Crockett; executive producer Salli Richardson-Whitfield; executive producer Bob Greenblatt; Writer/Co-Executive Producer Sonja Warfield; Co-Executive Producer Erica Dunbar. THE GILDED AGE is a co-production between HBO and Universal Television, a division of Universal Studio Group.

Gideon Appah represents the Ghana Pavilion at Triennale di Milano

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Gideon Appah, Blue River, 2020, Oil and acrylic on canvas, 240 x 300 cm. Courtesy the artist and Gallery 1957.
Gideon Appah, Blue River, 2020, Oil and acrylic on canvas, 240 x 300 cm. Courtesy the artist and Gallery 1957.

(Accra) – Gallery1957 announces Gideon Appah’s representation of the Ghana pavilion at the 23rd International Exhibition at Triennale di Milano. The ambitious new body of work, titled A Nubian Landscape, reflects themes and narratives that Appah has explored over the last three years, whilst also newly exploring figures inspired by the indigenous Nubian population of the central Nile valley, believed to be one of the earliest cradles of civilisation. The exhibition complements his current show Gideon Appah: Forgotten, Nudes, Landscapes, on view until June 19, 2022, at the Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University (ICA at VCU).
 
Appah’s figurative compositions are taken from newspaper clippings, entertainment posters, and films produced between the 1950s and the 80s to explore the rise and fall of Ghanian cinema and leisure culture and, at times, inspired by his imagination. Appah draws from personal experiences in the capital of Accra, presenting artistic archives of communal life in family settings, a visual journey through the individual and collective memories defining his West African childhood. He creates artworks wherein surrealism meets domesticity and folklore meets religion. In new-otherworldly works, Appah’s compositional range is evident in both the city and in domestic scenes: they feature figures in positions of leisure and depictions of rituals in areas where land and sky meet.
 
His landscapes, home to mysterious male spirits emerging from melancholy waters, sit alongside joyful family photographs and interiors from Ghana during the 80s and 90s. The surreal scenes of rural landscapes populated by unknown, indigenous people divorced from city influence are miraged with tropes from legend and myth. Here, he abandons the city scenes to create a world where romance can be radical in spiritual visions, guilty pleasures, or secret whispers; a world made of mysteriousness.
 
Appah’s most recent work manifests a new desire to paint atmospheric elements, particularly clouds and stars, as backgrounds to his poetic narrative. While pondering ways of painting not only the sky but also mountains, rivers, and hills we observe the artist’s transition from a recurrent use of a nostalgic blue, which permeated most of his compositions until date, to a strong red never used before. However, Appah’s visual poetry remains a dedication to love; Gideon’s characters are captured in bucolic views expressing this sentiment through their intimate bodily motions and a strong sense of fragility that perpetuate the artist’s long-standing eulogy to love and sentimentality.

About the Artist

Appah was born in Accra, Ghana in 1987. He received his Bachelor of Fine Arts at The Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi in 2012. Appah has held exhibitions in Ghana including his first solo show Sensation at the Goethe Institute in Accra (2013) and an End of Year Exhibition at the KNUST Museum (2012). In 2015 he was chosen as one of the top ten finalists in Ghana for the Kuenyehia Art Prize for Contemporary Ghanaian Arts. That same year Appah became the first international artist to win the 1st Merit Prize Award at the Barclays L’Atelier Art Competition in Johannesburg. This awarded him a 3-month artist residency at the Bag Factory Studios (2016) and a solo show at the Absa Gallery, Johannesburg (2017). Appah had a solo booth with Gallery 1957 at the 1-54 Contemporary Africa Art Fair, New York City (2018). Growing up in a large family, the works are reflective of a life characterized by strong emotional bonds, religious activities and folklore. Through nostalgic blues, deep green landscapes, and charcoal, his dreamlike compositions place typical domestic interiors from the 1980s and 90s Ghana against surreal landscapes.

About The 23rd International Exhibition

The Triennale di Milano, which is an event dedicated to the decorative arts, is officially recognised by the BIE (Bureau International des Expositions). Among all international exhibitions, it is expectational in that it has always been hosted in the same city. The 23rd International Exhibition features a constellation of exhibitions, offering a huge variety of points of view and opening up to interdisciplinary perspectives that will expand its vision of what we still don’t know we don’t know. Unknown Unknowns encompasses an array of skills and sensitivities and an attitude that relies on eyes that are free to adopt a new approach to the unknown. An environmental installation, created by Francis Kéré, rises up in the Palazzo dell’Arte, welcoming and accompanying visitors as they explore the unknown worlds represented in the various shows that constitute the 23rd International Exhibition. By presenting research projects that broaden our understanding, Triennale Milano renews its mission and, true to its history, it continues to reflect on the issues and emergencies facing the contemporary world.

Vampire in the Garden (2022). Netflix TV Series

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Vampire in the Garden (2022)
Vampire in the Garden (2022)

Vampire in the Garden is a new Netflix TV series directed by Ryotaro Makihara based on the characters created by Tetsuya Nishio.

Plot

Momo and Fine, are two girls from different backgrounds, a vampire and a human, who meet by chance. A story about an unlikely friendship between human and vampire race that intertwines with the power of music. (Source: ANN)

Release Date

May 16, 2022.

Where to Watch Vampire in the Garden (2022)

On Netflix.

Official TV Series Trailer

About the TV Series

Galalith, by Lauren Gault. Temple Bar Gallery + Studios

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Poster graphic design in collaboration with OR Studios, Dublin.
Poster graphic design in collaboration with OR Studios, Dublin.

Galalith is the first solo exhibition in Ireland by artist Lauren Gault. This exhibition is an expanded staging of her sculptural installations, responding to Temple Bar Gallery + Studios internal gallery space and the building’s external, environmental context. The exhibition incorporates sunlight caught by a street facing solar panel, a threaded assemblage featuring unused galalith(1) stock, recycled rubber safety surfacing, large scale suspended sculpture and a human/non human soundscape (solar controlled). Gault worked with independent feminist curator Katherine Murphy to research and realise this body of work, undertaking a collaborative studio residency at TBG+S.

Collaborations have been central to this exhibition, with Gault and Murphy working with the National Museum of Ireland to access bog butter(2) samples and a Viking ‘toggle’ artefact. This toggle example, found in nearby Fishamble Street, depicts the mythical wolf ‘Fenrir’ devouring the sun at the end of the world. Initially read as a ‘canine with ball’, the symbolism and mythology within this piece denotes both a benign act of domesticated play, and fraught environmental and non-human tensions. This artefact was researched along with contemporary ‘monster wolves’ – solar powered, robotic scarecrows which act as wildlife deterrents through the production of sound and a ‘wolfish’ appearance.(3)

Ireland has a rich lupine history – garnering the nickname ‘Wolf Land’ in the early 17th century, as well as its iconic wolf-hound breed and prospective re-wilding policies of today. These histories continue to circularly evolve, with our increase in demand for domestic canine pets, set against rising livestock and sheep worrying – a complex oscillation between domestication and wildness, of the controlled and unboundaried. 

Drawing from and combining these reference points, a specifically designed solar panel was developed with the Solar Energy Applications Group at Trinity College. This panel and its attached technology acts as a controller for the internal sound work, volumetrically shifting with the levels of solar energy present across each day. Rather than acting as a deterrent, these sounds are invitational – featuring calls produced by ‘speaking’ and barking ravens, howling wolf-dogs, sounds from the sun, and frequencies only detectable by the non-human.

There is a distinct presence of dual working contexts in the exhibition, with ephemera collected from city and active rural environments, expanding Gault’s ongoing research which engages with agri-relations and agroecology, matter interconnectivity, and agency within unstable micro and macro environmental systems. 

Gault’s material treatments and museological analysis techniques within Galalith, such as ‘micro-fading’ and solar-faded objects, give a tangible visualisation of a material’s future state. Through these works, the natural flow of time is interrupted, indicating the possibility of alternative or suspected futures, whilst raising questions around agency, conservation and loss.

Footnotes: (1) galalith ???? (gala, “milk”) and ?????? (lithos, “stone”) is a synthetic plastic material manufactured from the interaction of the protein ‘casein’ in milk and formaldehyde. Galalith was predominantly used in the production of objects which involved close human touch and bodily proximity, for example within jewellery and button production, pens, piano keys, combs, tokens, and plectrums. It is biodegradable, non-allergenic and virtually non-flammable. The galalith within this exhibition was sourced as unused stock from circa 1940-50 (sun damaged, un-worked rods and blanks); as well as some newly manufactured stock – currently used as an alternative to contemporary, oil based plastics. 

(2) bog butter – a fatty substance, usually dairy in origin, which has been buried and preserved, then found and resurfaced, in peat bogs in Ireland and Scotland. This practice dates back 3,500 years, with samples in Ireland dating from the first century CE. Often accidentally unearthed by farmers and turf cutters, this substance can appear uncannily fresh, emerging preserved from the peat bogs’ stable micro climate and into a new, current time. The bog butter form reproduced in this exhibition is from the townland Corlea in Co.Monaghan, accessed from the NMI stores, scanned and 3D printed into stone-like solidity. 

(3) Kuebiko is the Shinto deity of knowledge and agriculture. Often represented as a scarecrow which cannot move yet has a comprehensive awareness of the world, Kuebiko is a Japanese word which refers to fatigue generated by senseless violence. A spectral figure in the exhibition, Kuebiko is used to open up dialogue around environmental agency, shared feelings of potential loss/grief and the complexities of our evolving agri-relationships.

Biographies

Lauren Gault is a Magheramourne and Glasgow based artist, born in Belfast. She graduated from Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design in Dundee in 2008. Her recent solo exhibitions include: Cithra, The Tetley, Leeds (2021), C I T H R A, Gasworks, London (2020); forgets in knots, Kantine, Brussels (2019), drye eyes, Grand Union, Birmingham, (England 2019), O-n, The Workbench, Milan (2019), present cOmpany, CCA Derry~Londonderry, Northern Ireland (2018)

Katherine Murphy is a Scottish independent curator and producer. For the past decade she’s worked with not-for-profit organisations, prominent artists, art institutions, museums, and international art festivals. With a background in contemporary philosophy and a passion for developing expanded forms of feminist practices through a process of unfolding. Her Unfolding project (2021) works closely with artists to manifest and realise feminist, independent projects, sustainable working practices. Galalith is the first collaborative Unfolding project with support from TBG+S and Creative Scotland.

Lauren Gault and Katherine Murphy have undertaken a collaborative residency at TBG+S in the lead up to the exhibition and will stay until the end of May 2022. After the exhibition at TBG+S, the project and specific artworks will be re-imagined and relocated to an outdoor, rural location in Scotland. Murphy was awarded the opportunity to curate this exhibition through an Open Call held by TBG+S in 2021.

Galalith is funded by Temple Bar Gallery+Studios and Creative Scotland and supported by Gremolith Italia and Solar Energy, Applications Group @TCD Solar, Dept of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College Dublin.

Temple Bar Gallery + Studios

5 – 9 Temple Bar, Dublin 2,
D02 AC84, Ireland